Reprise: Impractical Applications (Keeping Track of a Battle)

Originally posted August 14, 2010.
I talked a while ago about a fight I’d run in my solo game, where the sole (and rather noncombatant) PC Kiriko was witness to a fight between her two allies, three enemies, and, at the very end, a third NPC. It was a formless, initiativeless, and pretty [...]

Reprise: How Not To Misplace People in a Scene

Originally posted August 12, 2010.
One of the biggest problems with having four or five people operating in the same scene, regardless of its type, is the risk that the better-imaged ones will take over and the less-definite ones will get lost in the shuffle. A couple days ago, UZ asked how to [...]

Reprise: Comparing Conversation and Combat

Originally posted on August 11, 2010.
What’s the difference between conversation and combat?
I found myself asking that of one of my friends, while thinking about UZ’s recent question on keeping all participants in a conversation involving more than four characters at once. I have difficulty with that sort of thing too, so I didn’t [...]

Impractical Applications (Scripting—Partly)

I’d had a plan this week. This, I am discovering, is generally a bad idea.
It seemed straightforward when it was still on the drawing board. Group’s dealing with having had to arrange a conversation between one of their closest allies and a very dangerous social monster with a bit of a grudge. Member of group [...]

Prepping for a Crowd

One of the toughest things I’ve ever found to do is writing scenes with lots and lots of characters (which can just mean “more than four or five who aren’t controlled by someone else”). I’ve talked about this before, mostly with characters all directly interacting with each other, but there always seems to be more [...]

Impractical Applications (Keeping Track of a Battle)

I talked a while ago about a fight I’d run in my solo game, where the sole (and rather noncombatant) PC Kiriko was witness to a fight between her two allies, three enemies, and, at the very end, a third NPC. It was a formless, initiativeless, and pretty much unscripted fight, involving a whole lot [...]

How Not To Be Lost in a Scene

Yesterday, I talked about how a GM or a writer can keep from misplacing characters in a character-dense scene. But while it’s harder for someone who controls multiple characters to keep perfect track of all of them, it’s still possible for even a PC to be misplaced in a scene. Everyone’s talking too fast, it’s [...]

How Not To Misplace People in a Scene

One of the biggest problems with having four or five people operating in the same scene, regardless of its type, is the risk that the better-imaged ones will take over and the less-definite ones will get lost in the shuffle. A couple days ago, UZ asked how to avoid that without creating a completely patterned [...]

Comparing Conversation and Combat

What’s the difference between conversation and combat?
I found myself asking that of one of my friends, while thinking about UZ’s recent question on keeping all participants in a conversation involving more than four characters at once. I have difficulty with that sort of thing too, so I didn’t really have too much to fall back [...]